Advertising in Social Networking: Are Facebook Fans Actually Worth the Effort?

| October 15, 2012 | 0 Comments

In 2012, it goes without saying that any business looking to make a big splash in online advertising needs a well-thought-out, consistently managed, popular Facebook fan page. Offering materials that play into the social

context, such as likeable ads and other forms of multimedia, guarantees a company’s social presence and can easily cement a brand’s legacy.

A Facebook page that attracts fans is something that no company undersells. Even the biggest brands out there, like McDonald’sand Coca-Cola, spend big money in order to transform their social pages into advertising pages, creating different leads and producing the kind of fervor around their products that only social media could produce. But are Facebook fans really all that important to a business?

Explaining a Facebook “Fan”

Liking the business as a consumer, while not seemingly a major step, is actually quite a large action to take. When you break it down, there are millions of different Facebook pages, and millions of different ads and other materials floating around the Internet. To take the time to actually like someone’s material means that a fan is certainly interested in either purchasing from the company, or at least following up.For Facebook as a specific social network, the term “fan” is often thrown around loosely and incorrectly. If someone subscribes to your newsletter or another brand of interaction via your Facebook page, you could consider this person a fan. But in this context, a fan is simply an individual who has “liked” a business’s Facebook page.

Why Receiving Facebook Ad and Page “Likes” is a Good Thing

To understand the role fans play for business advertising on Facebook, just take a look at a report released in August on one of the web’s biggest entertainment retailers, Play.com. According to the report, Play.com received an astounding 24% more businessfrom their fans than from their non-fans. This helped the Japanese firm rake in over $3 million in Facebook sales in 2011 alone.

This is how it all broke down for Play.com, and possibly how it can break down for any business choosing to focus more intently on Facebook fans.

It isn’t a complicated number to pin down; first-time customers who were brought to Play.com by way of Facebook spent an impressive 30% more on their first product than customers who found the site by other means.

What this signals is not only Facebook’s potential to drive more customers strong, but the site is actually trusted among consumers. Unlike other social networks featuring shoddy ads, a clean, efficient fan page on Facebook is a trusted source of information and obviously a tremendous advertising tool to have in the arsenal.

Quantifying the costs of fans and figuring out how to lure them in aside, it is more than apparent that having fans equates to increased business. Providing an immediate benefit to customers and allowing them to interact with your business model is a proven formula in online social media advertising.

Eric Taylor

Eric Taylor is a freelance business developer and a writer for the Facebook ad campaign tool Qwaya, which focuses on building tools for social media marketing. Qwaya provides information, tools and up-to-date news about Facebook marketing. The site aims to build a sophisticated tool with powerful features that are user-friendly and affordable for online advertisers and marketers world wide.

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In 2012, it goes without saying that any business looking to make a big splash in online advertising needs a well-thought-out, consistently managed, popular Facebook fan page. Offering materials that play into the social

context, such as likeable ads and other forms of multimedia, guarantees a company’s social presence and can easily cement a brand’s legacy.

A Facebook page that attracts fans is something that no company undersells. Even the biggest brands out there, like McDonald’sand Coca-Cola, spend big money in order to transform their social pages into advertising pages, creating different leads and producing the kind of fervor around their products that only social media could produce. But are Facebook fans really all that important to a business?

Explaining a Facebook “Fan”

Liking the business as a consumer, while not seemingly a major step, is actually quite a large action to take. When you break it down, there are millions of different Facebook pages, and millions of different ads and other materials floating around the Internet. To take the time to actually like someone’s material means that a fan is certainly interested in either purchasing from the company, or at least following up.For Facebook as a specific social network, the term “fan” is often thrown around loosely and incorrectly. If someone subscribes to your newsletter or another brand of interaction via your Facebook page, you could consider this person a fan. But in this context, a fan is simply an individual who has “liked” a business’s Facebook page.

Why Receiving Facebook Ad and Page “Likes” is a Good Thing

To understand the role fans play for business advertising on Facebook, just take a look at a report released in August on one of the web’s biggest entertainment retailers, Play.com. According to the report, Play.com received an astounding 24% more businessfrom their fans than from their non-fans. This helped the Japanese firm rake in over $3 million in Facebook sales in 2011 alone.

This is how it all broke down for Play.com, and possibly how it can break down for any business choosing to focus more intently on Facebook fans.

It isn’t a complicated number to pin down; first-time customers who were brought to Play.com by way of Facebook spent an impressive 30% more on their first product than customers who found the site by other means.

What this signals is not only Facebook’s potential to drive more customers strong, but the site is actually trusted among consumers. Unlike other social networks featuring shoddy ads, a clean, efficient fan page on Facebook is a trusted source of information and obviously a tremendous advertising tool to have in the arsenal.

Quantifying the costs of fans and figuring out how to lure them in aside, it is more than apparent that having fans equates to increased business. Providing an immediate benefit to customers and allowing them to interact with your business model is a proven formula in online social media advertising.

Eric Taylor

Eric Taylor is a freelance business developer and a writer for the Facebook ad campaign tool Qwaya, which focuses on building tools for social media marketing. Qwaya provides information, tools and up-to-date news about Facebook marketing. The site aims to build a sophisticated tool with powerful features that are user-friendly and affordable for online advertisers and marketers world wide.