Internet Marketing Glossary

Blog
Blog Optimization
Buzz Marketing
Campaign Negative Keywords
Click Through Rate (CTR)
Contextual Advertising
Conversational Marketing
Conversion
Conversion Page
Conversion Rate
Cost/Conversion
Cost Per Thousand Impressions (CPM)
CPC
Green Marketing
Impression
Impression Share
Internet Marketing
Local Business Ad
Online Marketing
Page Rank
PPC Advertising
Search Engine Marketing (SEM)
Search Engine Optimizatin (SEO)
Social Media Marketing (SMM)
Viral Marketing
Virtual World
Virtual World Optimization
WebAnalytics
Web Marketing

Blog

A blog (a contraction of the term “Web log”) is a Web site, usually maintained by an individual with regular entries of commentary, descriptions of events, or other material such as graphics or video. Entries are commonly displayed in reverse-chronological order. “Blog” can also be used as a verb, meaning to maintain or add content to a blog.

Many blogs provide commentary or news on a particular subject; others function as more personal online diaries. A typical blog combines text, images, and links to other blogs, Web pages, and other media related to its topic. The ability for readers to leave comments in an interactive format is an important part of many blogs. Most blogs are primarily textual, although some focus on art (artlog), photographs (photoblog), sketches (sketchblog), videos (vlog), music (MP3 blog), audio (podcasting), which are part of a wider network of social media. Micro-blogging is another type of blogging, one which consists of blogs with very short posts. As of December 2007, blog search engine Technorati was tracking more than 112 million blogs.[1] With the advent of video blogging, the word blog has taken on an even looser meaning — that of any bit of media wherein the subject expresses his opinion or simply talks about something.

Blog Optimization

The process of restructuring a blog platform so that posts and pages will be indexed by search engines. This can include optimizing posts, permalinks, meta-tags, internal link structure, etc.

Buzz Marketing

Buzz Marketing or Marketing buzz is a term used in word-of-mouth marketing.

Buzz is a form of hype among consumers,[1] a vague but positive association, excitement, or anticipation about a product or service. Positive “buzz” is often a goal of viral marketing, public relations, and of advertising on Web 2.0 media.

Campaign Negative Keywords

You can prevent entire campaigns from showing on a certain query by applying negative keywords to them. (Negative keywords contain a ‘-’ in front of the keyword.) For example, the negative keyword -luxury tells the AdWords system not to show your ad for any search containing the term ‘luxury.’

By filtering out unwanted impressions, negative keywords can help you reach the most appropriate prospects, reduce your cost-per-click (CPC), and increase your ROI. In this manner, you can generate more highly-targeted impressions for content sites on the Google Network.

Watch the ‘Negative Keywords’ video to learn about choosing the right negative keywords and why they’re important to your AdWords account.

Clickthrough rate (CTR)

is the number of clicks your ad receives divided by the number of times your ad is shown (impressions) via Google search only. Your ad and keyword each have their own CTRs, unique to your own campaign performance.

A keyword’s CTR is a strong indicator of its relevance to the user and the overall success of the keyword. For example, a well targeted keyword that shows a similarly targeted ad is more likely to have a higher CTR than a general keyword with non-specific ad text. The more your keywords and ads relate to each other and to your business, the more likely a user is to click on your ad after searching on your keyword phrase.

A low CTR may point to poor keyword performance, indicating a need for ad or keyword optimization. Therefore, you can use CTR to gauge which ads and keywords aren’t performing as well for you and then optimize them.

CTR is also used to determine your keyword’s Quality Score. Higher CTR and Quality Score can lead to lower costs and higher ad position.

Contextual advertising

Google leverages our award-winning search technology to deliver relevant AdWords ads to content pages of sites and products in the Google Network. Our technology draws upon our understanding of the billions of pages in our search index and our ability to crawl web pages to figure out which keywords would lead a user to the page. Then, we match ads to the page based on those keywords.

Conversational Marketing

Conversational Marketing is the engagement of social media by a corporation to promote their product or brand. It differs from traditional forms of “customer touch” because the company may enter into an online dialogue which is stored publicly in a forum or blog. The company may also take the conversation offline. As of September 2007, it seems to be a Buzzword in marketing and Customer relationship management. The idea is to break down the common assumption that marketing involves the broadcasting of information from a marketer to an audience, and replace it with something more interactive.

Conversion

When a user completes an action on your site, such as buying something or requesting more information.

Conversion Page

The conversion page is the page that, when reached by a user, means business results for you. Depending on your type of site, it may be the page where a user will complete a purchase or fill out an interest form.

Conversion Rate

Your conversion rate is the number of conversions divided by the number of ad clicks. Conversions are only counted on Google and some of our Google Network partners. Using Website Optimizer, you’ll be trying to increase your conversion rate and therefore improve your return on investment.

Cost / Conversion

The total cost divided by the total number of conversions. This statistic gives you the amount spent per conversion. Conversions are counted only on Google and some of our Google Network partners. The cost-per-conversion is adjusted to reflect only the cost of ad clicks on which we can track conversions.

Cost-per-thousand impressions (CPM)

This stands for cost-per-thousand impressions. A CPM pricing model means advertisers pay for impressions received.

CPC

The cost-per-click (CPC) is the amount you pay each time a user clicks on your ad.

Green Marketing

According to the American Marketing Association, green marketing is the marketing of products that are presumed to be environmentally safe. Thus, green marketing incorporates a broad range of activities, including product modification, changes to the production process, packaging changes, as well as modifying advertising. Yet defining green marketing is not a simple task, where several meanings intersect and contradict each other. An example of this will be the existence of varying social, environmental and retail definitions attached to this term. Other similar terms used are Environmental Marketing and Ecological Marketing.

Impression

The “Impr” located on your reporting statistics refers to the number of “impressions” for your ad. The number of impressions is the number of times an ad is displayed on Google or on sites or products in the Google Network.
Internet marketing, also referred to as web marketing, online marketing, or eMarketing, is the marketing of products or services over the Internet.

Impression share

Impression share is a new AdWords metric that represents the percentage of impressions where your ads were shown out of the total available impressions in the market you were targeting. This metric is available at the campaign and account level for search.

Internet Marketing

Internet marketing, also referred to as web marketing, online marketing, or eMarketing, is the marketing of products or services over the Internet.

Local Business Ad

Location-based AdWords are associated with a business listing in Google Maps.

Online Marketing

The Internet has brought many unique benefits to marketing, one of which being lower costs for the distribution of information and media to a global audience. The interactive nature of Internet marketing, both in terms of providing instant response and eliciting responses, is a unique quality of the medium. Internet marketing is sometimes considered to have a broader scope because it refers to digital media such as the Internet, e-mail, and wireless media. However, Internet marketing also includes management of digital customer data and electronic customer relationship management (ECRM) systems.

Internet marketing ties together creative and technical aspects of the Internet, including design, development, advertising, and sales. Internet marketing does not simply entail building or promoting a website, nor does it mean placing a banner ad on another website. Effective Internet marketing requires a comprehensive strategy that synergizes a given company’s business model and sales goals with its website function and appearance, focusing on its target market through proper choice of advertising type, media, and design.

Internet marketing also refers to the placement of media along different stages of the customer engagement cycle through search engine marketing (SEM), search engine optimization (SEO), banner ads on specific websites, e-mail marketing, and Web 2.0 strategies. In 2008, The New York Times working with comScore, published an initial estimate to quantify the user data collected by large Internet-based companies. Counting four types of interactions with company websites in addition to the hits from advertisements served from advertising networks, the authors found the potential for collecting data upward of 2,500 times on average per user per month.

Page Rank

PageRank is a link analysis algorithm used by the Google Internet search engine that assigns a numerical weighting to each element of a hyperlinked set of documents, such as the World Wide Web, with the purpose of “measuring” its relative importance within the set. The algorithm may be applied to any collection of entities with reciprocal quotations and references. The numerical weight that it assigns to any given element E is also called the PageRank of E and denoted by PR(E).

The name “PageRank” is a trademark of Google, and the PageRank process has been patented (U.S. Patent 6,285,999 ). However, the patent is assigned to Stanford University and not to Google. Google has exclusive license rights on the patent from Stanford University. The university received 1.8 million shares in Google in exchange for use of the patent; the shares were sold in 2005 for $336 million.

PPC Advertising

The pricing structure used by some online channels to charge an advertiser each time a user clicks on the advertiser’s ad. The amount is usually set by the advertiser, not by the channel. Also called cost-per-click (CPC).

Search Engine Marketing (SEM)

Search engine marketing, or SEM, is a form of Internet marketing that seeks to promote websites by increasing their visibility in search engine result pages (SERPs). According to the Search Engine Marketing Professional Organization, SEM methods include: search engine optimization (or SEO), paid placement, contextual advertising, and paid inclusion. Other sources, including the New York Times, define SEM as the practice of buying paid search listings.

Search Engine Optimization (SEO)

Search engine optimization (SEO) is the process of improving the volume and quality of traffic to a web site from search engines via “natural” (“organic” or “algorithmic”) search results. Typically, the higher a site’s “page rank” (i.e, the earlier it comes in the search results list), the more visitors it will receive from the search engine. SEO can also target different kinds of search; including image search, local search, and industry-specific vertical search engines.

As an Internet marketing strategy, SEO considers how search engines work and what people search for. Optimizing a website primarily involves editing its content and HTML coding to both increase its relevance to specific keywords and to remove barriers to the indexing activities of search engines.

The acronym “SEO” can also refer to “search engine optimizers,” a term adopted by an industry of consultants who carry out optimization projects on behalf of clients and by employees who perform SEO services in-house. Search engine optimizers may offer SEO as a stand-alone service or as a part of a broader marketing campaign. Because effective SEO may require changes to the HTML source code of a site, SEO tactics may be incorporated into web site development and design. The term “search engine friendly” may be used to describe web site designs, menus, content management systems and shopping carts that are easy to optimize.

Another class of techniques, known as black hat SEO or Spamdexing, use methods such as link farms and keyword stuffing that degrade both the relevance of search results and the user-experience of search engines. Search engines look for sites that employ these techniques in order to remove them from their indices.

Social Media Marketing (SMM)

Social media signifies a broad spectrum of topics and has several different connotations. In the context of Internet marketing, Social Media refers to a collective group of web properties whose content is primarily published by users, not direct employees of the property (e.g. the vast majority of video on YouTube is published by non-YouTube employees). Social media optimization (SMO) is a set of methods for generating publicity through social media, online communities and community websites

Social media marketing has two important aspects. The first, SMO, refers to on-page tactics through which a webmaster can improve a website for the age of social media. Such optimization includes adding links to services such as Digg, Reddit and Del.icio.us so that their pages can be easily ‘saved and submitted’ to and for these services.

Social media marketing, on the other hand, is about building ways that fans of a brand or company can promote it themselves in multiple online social media venues.

Some social media marketers offer to write content that is remarkable, unique, and newsworthy. This content can then be marketed by popularizing it or even by creating a “viral” video on YouTube and other video sites, including getting involved in blogs, forums, and niche communities. Others in the social media world consider this form of social media marketing Astroturfing or “fake grass roots”.[1]

According to Lloyd Salmons, first chairman of the Internet Advertising Bureau social media council, “Social media isn’t just about big networks like Facebook and MySpace, it’s about brands having conversations”[2]. In fact, most individuals who study the space believe social media is about people having conversations, not brands.[3]

Viral Marketing

Viral marketing and viral advertising refer to marketing techniques that use pre-existing social networks to produce increases in brand awareness or to achieve other marketing objectives (such as product sales) through self-replicating viral processes, analogous to the spread of pathological and computer viruses. It can be word-of-mouth delivered or enhanced by the network effects of the Internet.[1] Viral promotions may take the form of video clips, interactive Flash games, advergames, ebooks, brandable software, images, or even text messages. The basic form of viral marketing is not infinitely sustainable.

The goal of marketers interested in creating successful viral marketing programs is to identify individuals with high Social Networking Potential (SNP) and create Viral Messages that appeal to this segment of the population and have a high probability of being passed along.

Virtual World

A virtual world is a computer-based simulated environment intended for its users to inhabit and interact via avatars. These avatars are usually depicted as textual, two-dimensional, or three-dimensional graphical representations, although other forms are possible[1] (auditory[2] and touch sensations for example). Some, but not all, virtual worlds allow for multiple users.

The computer accesses a computer-simulated world and presents perceptual stimuli to the user, who in turn can manipulate elements of the modeled world and thus experiences telepresence to a certain degree.[3] Such modeled worlds may appear similar to the real world or instead depict fantasy worlds. The model world may simulate rules based on the real world or some hybrid fantasy world. Example rules are gravity, topography, locomotion, real-time actions, and communication. Communication between users has ranged from text, graphical icons, visual gesture, sound, and rarely, forms using touch, voice command, and balance senses.

Multiplayer online games commonly depict a world very similar to the real world, with real world rules and real-time actions and communication. Communication is usually textual, with real-time voice communication using VOIP also possible.

Virtual worlds are not limited to games but, depending on the degree of immediacy presented, can encompass computer conferencing and text based chatrooms. Sometimes, emoticons or ‘smilies’ are available to show feeling or facial expression. Emoticons often have a keyboard shortcut.

Virtual World Optimization

The process of improving virtual world environments by tracking and analyzing Virtual World Analytics data.

Web Analytics

Web analytics is the measurement, collection, analysis and reporting of internet data for purposes of understanding and optimizing web site usage.

There are two categories of web analytics; off-site and on-site web analytics.

Off-site web analytics refers to web measurement and analysis irrespective of whether you own or maintain a website. It includes the measurement of a website’s potential audience (opportunity), share of voice (visibility), and buzz (comments) that is happening on the Internet as a whole.

On-site web analytics measure a visitor’s journey once on your website. This includes its drivers and conversions; for example, which landing pages encourage people to make a purchase. On-site web analytics measures the performance of your website in a commercial context. This data is typically compared against key performance indicators for performance and used to improve a web site or marketing campaign’s audience response.

Web Marketing

Internet marketing, also referred to as web marketing, online marketing, or eMarketing, is the marketing of products or services over the Internet.

* These definitions were taken from Google and Wikipedia

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